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Nuclear Medicine

Bone Scan

A bone scan is used to determine whether you have any bone abnormalities that may be related to one of the following symptoms or conditions:

  • Fractures
  • Arthritis
  • Paget's disease
  • Cancer of the bone
  • Cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the bone from another site such as prostate, breast or lung
  • Infection of the joints or bones (osteomyelitis)
  • Avascular necrosis or impaired blood supply to the bone
  • Unexplained bone pain

Preparing for you scan:

No preparation is required. You may eat, drink and take your medications.

What to Expect during your scan:

A bone scan is divided into two basic parts:

  • The injection: You will get an injection of a radioactive tracer into the vien in your arm. There are no reactions or side effects from this injection. You may have a 2 to 4 hour delay to give the tracer time to circulate and be absorbed by your bones. During this 2 to 4 hours, you may leave the hospital. You also may eat and /or drink.
  • The scan: During the scan, you will be asked to lie still, on your back while the nuclear medicine gamma camera passes over your body. The scan will be of your entire body and may take up to 1 hour.

After the study, you may go about your normal activities.

Results:

The radiologist will send a report to your physician and your physicians office will inform you of your results.


Gastric Emptying Study

A gastric emptying study is a procedure that measures the speed at which food empties from the stomach and enters the small intestine.

The gastric emptying study helps with the diagnosis of:

  • Gastroparesis
  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Bloating
  • Chronic aspiration
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Rapid emptying

Preparing for your study:

Fast for 8 hours. This includes both food and drink.

Delay your medication. Pain medications can cause a delay emptying of the stomach and Reglan and erythromycin can cause a rapid emptying. Inform your physician of all medications you are taking.

Inform your physician if you are allergic to eggs.

What to expect during your study:

Your study will last 2 to 2 ½ hours. You will be asked to go to the restroom prior to the start of the study.

You will eat a radioactive scrambled egg sandwich and juice, (unless you have an allergy to eggs) and then be positioned on the exam table on your back.

As you lie on the exam table a gamma camera is positioned over your abdomen and will be taking pictures continuously for 2 hours. It is very important that you do not move during this time. You will be provided a DVD player if you would like to bring a movie. There are no side effects or reactions associated with this study. After the study, you may go about your normal activities.

Results:

The radiologist will send a report to your physician and your physicians office will inform you of your results.

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Hepatobiliary Scan

A HEPATOBILIARY scan also known as HIDA or DISIDA is an imaging procedure that tracks the production and flow of bile from your liver to your small intestine. Bile is a fluid produced by your liver that helps your digestive system break down fats.

The HEPATOBILIARY SCAN is a nuclear medicine scan that helps with the diagnosis of several diseases and conditions, such as

  • Bile duct obstruction
  • Bile leakage
  • Congenital abnormalities in the bile ducts
  • Gallbladder inflammation (cholecystitis)
  • Gallstones

The Ejection fraction of the gallbladder can also be measured, this is the rate at which the gallbladder releases bile.

Preparing for your scan:

Fast for 6 to 8 hours. This includes food and drinks

Delay your medication. There are certain medications that interfere with the gallbladders ability to empty. Tell your doctor about all medications you are taking.

What to expect during your scan:

Your exam will last 1 ½ to 2 hours. You will be asked to go to the restroom prior to the start of the exam. You will be positioned on your back and an IV will be started.

A radioactive isotope will be injected into the IV. This radioactive tracer will travels though your bloodstream and is taken up by the bile producing cells and then travels from your liver to your gallbladder and through the ducts to your small intestine.

As you lie on the table a gamma camera is positioned over your abdomen and is taking pictures as the tracer moves through your body. Pictures are taken continuously for 1 ½ hours.

You will need to keep still during the scan. If you would like to bring a movie to watch during your scan we will provide a DVD player. One hour into your scan, we will give you and injection of a medication called Kinevac that will make your gallbladder contract. You may feel some abdominal cramping and some nausea for about 4 to 5 minutes. The scan will continue for 30 minutes after this injection. After the scan you may go about your normal activities.

Results:

The radiologist will send a report to your physician, and your physicians office will inform you of your results.

 

Thyroid Uptake and Scan

Purpose:

  • To determine the size, shape, position and function of the thyroid gland
  • To diagnose the cause of an over active or under active thyroid gland
  • To evaluate thyroid nodules for activity or inactivity

Preparation:

Inform your physician as to any medications you are taking, both prescription and over the counter. Thyroid medications interfere with the results of the test.

Inform your physician of any test you have had in the last 2 months that included an injection of iodine contrast. (CT, IVP, Heart Cath, surgery) If you are a female 12 to 60 years of age and have not had a complete hysterectomy, you will have a blood pregnancy test done the morning of the thyroid scan.

Fast for 8 hours. This includes food and drink Inform your physician if you are breast feeding

What to expect during your scan:

The thyroid uptake and scan has three (3) appointment times over two (2) days. You will be given a capsule with a small dose of radioactive iodine. You may eat and drink one (1) hour after you take the pill. You will return in six (6) hours for your uptake and your first scan, this will take approximately 1 hour. For the scan, you will be on an exam table with a nuclear camera placed above your head and neck. You must be very still during the pictures.

You will return the next morning for your 24 hour uptake. This should take about 5 minutes. After the scan you may go about your normal activities.

Results:

The radiologist will send a report to your physician, and your physician will inform you of your results.

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